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The Resus Room

Podcasts from the website TheResusRoom.co.uk Promoting excellent care in and around the resus room, concentrating on critical appraisal, evidenced based medicine and international guidelines.
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Now displaying: November, 2018
Nov 23, 2018

We were delighted to be back to cover the joint Faculty of Prehospital Care and BASICS conference, day 2,  held at the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh. Again we were absolutely spoilt for choice when it came to content for the podcasts but we managed to catch up with:

• Dr Anne Weaver – a consultant in Emergency Medicine and Prehospital Care working for the Royal London Hospital and London HEMS. She talked to us about chemical burns and a novel treatment for managing these injuries.
• Dr Virginia Beckett – an Obstetrics and Gynaecology consultant who is a member of the mMOET working group and has recently published on the topic of cardiac arrest in pregnancy. She was talking on the topic of resuscitative hysterotomy.
• Sam Cooper – a Critical Care Paramedic from Derbyshire, Leicestershire and Rutland Air Ambulance who discussed a case of prehospital amputation and the learning points that arose from it.
• Dr Rob Lloyd – an Emergency Medicine trainee, blogger and fellow podcaster who has an interest in performance psychology. He talked about Mental Toughness, framed by his experiences working in a hospital deep in a South African township.

Once again, our thanks to Caroline Leech for being instrumental in the organisation of today and inviting us up. We’re already looking forward to next year….

Enjoy!

SimonRob & James

References

PonderMed

Diphoterine

A video showing a similar demonstration to the one at the conference showing why Diphoterine works and the limitations of water

Pre-hospital Obstetric Emergency Training; POET

VA Beckett, M Knight, P Sharpe, 2017, 'The CAPS Study: incidence, management and outcomes of cardiac arrest in pregnancy in the UK: a prospective, descriptive study', BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, vol. 124, no. 9, pp. 1374-1381

Realtime simulation of peri-mortem c-section; Bradford Teaching Hospital

K. M. Porter, 2010, 'Prehospital amputation', Emergency Medicine Journal, vol. 27, no. 12, pp. 940-942

Caroline Leech, Keith Porter, 2016, 'Man or machine? An experimental study of prehospital emergency amputation', Emergency Medicine Journal, vol. 33, no. 9, pp. 641-644

 

Nov 20, 2018

We were delighted to be invited to cover the joint Faculty of Prehospital Care and BASICS conference held at the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh.

This two-day prehospital extravaganza covered a broad range of topics and the content was delivered by some excellent speakers. As such, we were absolutely spoilt for choice when it came to content for the podcasts but we managed to catch up with:

  • Dr Abi Hoyle – a paediatric emergency medicine consultant with a background in military and retrieval services. She gave us some key tips when dealing with paediatric patients.
  • Ian Dunbar – a technical and medical rescue consultant with years of experience in the UK Fire and Rescue Service and ongoing involvement with British Touring Car Championship and the FIA. He did some myth busting around extrication from vehicles.
  • Professor Mike Tipton – a leading figure in extreme physiology who is the Associate Head of Research at the Extreme Environments Laboratory in Portsmouth, is trustee/director of Surf Life Saving GB, sits on the medical committee for the RNLI and was awarded an MBE for services to physiological research in extreme environments. Mike spoke on the topic of drowning.

Massive thanks to Dr Caroline Leech who put together this brilliant programme and extended the invitation to us. We hope you enjoy the podcast and extract some learning to inform your practice.

Enjoy!

SimonRob & James

References

Resus Council UK; Prehospital Resuscitation

Michael J. Shattock, Michael J. Tipton, 2012, '‘Autonomic conflict’: a different way to die during cold water immersion?',The Journal of Physiology, vol. 590, no. 14, pp. 3219-3230 

Faculty of Pre-Hospital Care and Basics Conference

Nov 8, 2018

We've heard a lot about advanced airway management recently, with some really significant publications over the last few months and in the last few weeks in JAMA we've had another!

Cricoid pressure during emergency anaesthesia and for those at high risk of aspiration has been common place for more than half a century. But it's a topic that has caused quite some debate. On one hand it has the potential to reduce aspiration, a very real and potentially very serious complication of RSI. But on the other it has the potential to hinder the view on laryngoscopy and decrease first pass success.

The founding evidence for cricoid pressure has always been a little soft. In this podcast we look at the background of cricoid pressure and then run through this key paper, discussing the implications it holds for both pre and in-hospital advanced airway management.

As always we'd love to hear any thoughts or comments you have on the website and via twitter, we look forward to hearing from you.

Enjoy!

Simon, Rob & James

References

Effect of Cricoid Pressure Compared With a Sham Procedure in the Rapid Sequence Induction of Anaesthesia: The IRIS Randomized Clinical Trial. Birenbaum A. JAMA Surg 2018

Cricoid pressure to control regurgitation of stomach contents during induction of anaesthesia. Sellick BA Lancet.1961

Safer Prehospital Anaesthesia 2017;AAGBI

JC: Cricoid Pressure and RSI, do we still need it?St Emlyn’s

Cricoid: To press, or not to press?(Hinds and May)

 

Nov 1, 2018

Welcome back to November's Papers Podcast! We've got 3 great papers for you again this month.

First up we take a look at a paper that looks to quantify the amount of experience needed to be a proficient intubator, in this case in arrest. Next we have a look at a paper which shows a significant difference in mortality in cardiac arrest dependant on the intravascular access route used. Finally we have a look a really interesting paper in the dispatch method of a HEMS service which we be of real interest to all those involved in paramedicine and prehospital critical care.

Make sure you take a look at the papers themselves and form your own opinions. We'd love to hear any thoughts and feedback you have.

Enjoy!

Simon & Rob

References & Further Reading

How much experience do rescuers require to achieve successful tracheal intubation during cardiopulmonary resuscitation? Kim SY. Resuscitation.2018

A novel method of non-clinical dispatch is associated with a higher rate of criticalHelicopter Emergency Medical Service intervention. Munro S .Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med.2018

Intraosseous Vascular Access Is Associated With Lower Survival and Neurologic Recovery Among Patients With Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest. Kawano T. Ann Emerg Med.2018

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