Info

The Resus Room

Podcasts from the website TheResusRoom.co.uk Promoting excellent care in and around the resus room, concentrating on critical appraisal, evidenced based medicine and international guidelines.
RSS Feed Subscribe in Apple Podcasts
The Resus Room
2019
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2018
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2017
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2016
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March


All Episodes
Archives
Now displaying: November, 2016
Nov 17, 2016

Patients frequently present to the Emergency Department either with direct concern following an upper gastro intestinal bleed, or with a history that points towards the diagnosis.

When these patients are haemodynamically unstable or with ongoing high volume bleeding the decision to admit or discharge becomes simple.

But when the episode has settled, deciding whether they are safe to be discharged and continue with outpatient follow up can be difficult. Lots of us use scoring systems such as the Glasgow-Batchford Score or the Rockall Score but how much do we actually understand regarding the 'positive' and 'negative' outcomes of those scores?

A recent paper on the topic helps to cast some light on the topic and forms the basis of this podcast.

One of the frequently used scoring systems is the Glasgow-Blatchford score below that bases it's score upon historical, physiological and laboratory findings.

mdcalc GBS scoring calculator

Probably the other most frequently used score in ED is the Rockall score, which in its full form utilises endoscopy findings, however for use in the ED (pre-endoscopy) it has been modified and utilised.

mdcalc pre-endoscopy Rockall Score

Have a listen to how these scores fare in the paper and it may inform your risk stratification in the ED.

Enjoy!

References and Further Reading
 

The Predictive Value of Pre-Endoscopic Risk Scores to Predict Adverse Outcomes in Emergency Department Patients with Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding - A Systematic Review. Ramaekers R. Acad Emerg Med. 2016

Upper Gastro Intestinal Bleeding at St.Emlyn’s

Nov 10, 2016

It's never long before the topic of pulmonary embolism makes it back into the controversial lime light and a recent paper on the association of PE with syncope is the lastest reason.

The PESIT trial, just published in the New England Journal of Medicine certainly grabs your attention when you read the abstract, with the implication that PE's are a major and hugely missed cause of the presentation of syncope. It also highlights a diagnostic work up that consists of blanket Well's scoring +/- d-dimer to decide who should be worked up further for the potential diagnosis, for every single patient presenting with syncope, including those with no appropriate symptoms or signs!

As always to read the abstract and draw a conclusion is to fall at the first hurdle, so take a listen to the podcast as we dive a bit deeper into the paper and topic, and of course make sure you take a look at the paper yourself and see what you make of the headline grabbing article

Enjoy!

References and Further Reading

Prevalence of Pulmonary Embolism among Patients Hospitalized for Syncope. Prandoni P. N Engl J Med. 2016

Incidence of asymptomatic pulmonary embolism in moderately to severely injured trauma patients. Schultz DJ.Trauma. 2004 Apr 

Prospective evaluation of unsuspected pulmonary embolism on contrast enhanced multidetector CT (MDCT) scanning. Ritchie G. Thorax. 2007 Jun.

EM Nerd-The Case of the Incidental Bystander

JC: Prevalence of PE in patients with syncope. St.Emlyn’s

Nov 1, 2016

This month the literature seems to be focussed on cardiac arrest

In this podcast we'll cover a paper looking at the significance of chest compression rate, ultrasound for prognostication (and to a lesser extent identification of tamponade) and finally a systematic review and meta-analysis of PCI following ROSC.

The PCI paper follows on nicely from our previous podcast on the topic, so make sure you have a listen to that one first.

Our sponsors ADPRAC are giving away another £30 iTunes voucher to spend on education/entertainment to support your work life balance! All you need to do is click the link on our home page through to the ADPRAC website and answer the question relating to the podcast, good luck!

References & Further Reading

Association between chest compression rates and clinical outcomes following in-hospital cardiac arrest at an academic tertiary hospital. Kilgannon JH. Resuscitation. 2016 

Emergency department point-of-care ultrasound in out-of-hospital and in-ED cardiac arrest. Gaspari R. Resuscitation. 2016 

Emergency department point-of-care ultrasound in out-of-hospital and in-ED cardiac arrest. Gaspari R. Resuscitation 2016

EM Nerd-The Case of the Tell-Tale Heart

JC: Is this the REASON to use USS in cardiac arrest? St.Emlyn’s

1