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The Resus Room

Podcasts from the website TheResusRoom.co.uk Promoting excellent care in and around the resus room, concentrating on critical appraisal, evidenced based medicine and international guidelines.
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Now displaying: December, 2020
Dec 14, 2020

So for decades people have talked about Contrast Induced Nephropathy…or Contrast Induced Acute Kidney Injury, depending on the decade and location of discussion. The theory being that diuresis, increased urine viscosity and changes in vasoconstriction and vasodilation leads to a worsening of renal function following iv contrast administration.

It seems to come from the 1950’s where some patients were seen to develop acute kidney injuries following iv contrast. Now times have changed and treatments and contrasts evolved but the discussion around contrast induced nephropathy continues. At times these discussion can mean that some patients wait for scans in the Emergency Department whilst waiting for blood tests to come back first. But is this the right thing to do?

In this episode we take a look at the origins of contrast induced nephropathy, consider some recent publications on the topic and see how this translates to practice and applications of the most recent guidelines.

Reading around the topic has been hugely informative for us and we hope will be of benefit to you too!

Enjoy

Simon & Rob

Dec 1, 2020

Welcome back to December's Papers of The Month Podcast! Three more papers for you which will challenge and inform you practice.

First up we have a look at a systematic review and meta-analysis which considers the fluid choice in resuscitating those patients with suspected traumatic brain injury in the prehospital setting; should we be reaching for the hypertonic solutions, or is an isotonic fluid such as normal saline adequate?

Next we take a look at a paper that has received a lot of online discussion which looks at the two approaches of antibiotics or surgery for an appendicitis. This is a randomised control trial that looks to answer a question that the literature has dipped into over the last few years, but this RCT goes that bit further and will help give patients a good idea of the pro's and con's of each approach.

Finally we take a look at the UK national approach to oxygenation strategies in those patients receiving a prehospital emergency anaesthetic. How many clinicians provide PEEP, how commonly implemented is apnoeic oxygenation and do we all ventilate through apnoea? Gaining an understanding as to where our practice sits compared to others gives us the opportunity to consider the potential benefits and downsides of various strategies and may help unify practice to more streamlined working and better outcomes for our patients. We also get the opportunity to hear thoughts on the subject from one of the authors Dr. Amar Amshru, Emergency Medicine and and Pre Hospital Doctor in London and with Kent Surrey and Sussex Air Ambulance.

Enjoy!

Simon & Rob

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