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The Resus Room

Podcasts from the website TheResusRoom.co.uk Promoting excellent care in and around the resus room, concentrating on critical appraisal, evidenced based medicine and international guidelines.
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Now displaying: December, 2021
Dec 15, 2021

Critically unwell patients often present with inadequate oxygenation and ventilation, in this episode we’re going to explore some of the physiology of critical illness, look at how we can improve oxygenation and ventilation, take a look mechanical ventilation and have a think about how we can deliver this to a really high level.

We’ll be covering the following;

  • Type 1 & 2 respiratory failure
  • Breathing assessment
  • Optimising patients own ventilation
  • Mechanical ventilation
  • Modes of ventilation
  • Setting up a ventilator; tidal volume, RR, FiO2, I:E ratios, dead space
  • End tidal CO2
  • Optimising oxygenation & ventilation
  • Hand ventilation
  • Ventilation in cardiac arrest

Once again we’d love to hear any thoughts or feedback either on the website or via twitter @TheResusRoom.

Enjoy!

Simon, Rob & James

Dec 1, 2021

Welcome back to December’s paper of the month podcast!

In the first paper this month we take a look at a paper that assesses the utility of CT scans for patients presenting with fever of an unknown origin; could this help us identify the source more frequently and if so how often?

Next, we often focus on the specific of medical management in cardiac arrest, but what impact does witnessing a cardiac arrest have on bystanders and could this affect the way we interact and behave on scene?

Lastly we consider those patients that require a prehospital anaesthetic following return of spontaneous circulation from a medical cardiac arrest. Does the choice of induction agent between midazolam and ketamine affect the likelihood of hypotension and other complications?

Once again we’d love to hear any thoughts or feedback either on the website or via twitter @TheResusRoom.

Simon & Rob

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